Soulful Glory – Danielle Miraglia

DanielleMOriginally appeared in 23 June 2016 Seacoast Scene | Photo Credit: David Dyte

In bygone times, when radio was king and fans paid for music, one imagines Danielle Miraglia’s latest CD Glory Junkies bursting upon the airwaves in her home town of Boston. Carter Allen at WBCN would praise its Exile on Main Street esprit title song, gush over her soulful strut on “Warning Fair Warning,” and note the elegiac beauty of “Carmella,” written for her late grandmother.

That was then, and as the album’s penultimate song points out in its title, most people these days are “Famous for Nothin’.” A People magazine nip slip or YouTub lip sync gets more attention than actual music. “You gotta sink to the occasion,” laments Miraglia.

The cover features the singer-songwriter and guitarist snapping a deliberately ironic duck-lipped selfie. “People were like, why did she do that, it doesn’t look like her,” Miraglia said in recent phone interview, “and I’m like, ‘don’t you get it?”

This theme runs throughout the record, and is captured neatly on “Pigeons,” a spare song recorded near the end of sessions for the album in March 2015. With studio crosstalk between her and producer Tom Bianchi – also her husband – it’s sounds like an outtake, but it cut to the core of what it takes to make a living as an artist.

“All those stories of rock story glory that once felt attainable … hit with a wrecking ball,” she sings, then adds, “but the suntanned child in me still hopes for more.” That’s a good thing. Miraglia made two records before Glory Junkies, the bluesy Nothing Romantic in 2005 and 2011’s stripped down Box of Troubles, but the new disc out-rocks both,, and is her most fully realized effort.

“My influences are rock ‘n’ roll, not folk,” Miraglia said; she grew up in Revere, Mass. listening to Guns n’ Roses and Rolling Stones cassettes on her Walkman. “What made me want to play music was the rock stuff, so it makes sense that I went in that direction. I still like the singer-songwriter stuff, too, but I wanted to make a rock record.”

With a degree in creative writing from Emerson College, Miraglia knows how to turn a phrase, as evidenced on the tender “Heat of the Win,” which uses her father’s Red Sox devotion as a metaphor for love and loss. “Carmella” captures with unflinching honesty her grandparents’ struggles and enduring love. Both recording the song and sharing it with her mother proved challenging.

“I have been so reluctant to record that song because my mother hadn’t heard it, and it’s such a personal story,” Miraglia said. “I actually had a little panic attack while I was doing vocals … I started getting where I couldn’t breathe.”

She sent the finished record to her mom, followed by a warning text. “She sent me this long text saying ‘I love the song – I can’t call you right now because I’m too emotional to actually talk, but I think it honored her and showed her side of the struggle … I think you honored her, and you honored Grandpa.’ It ended up being a really beautiful family moment.”

The best thing about Glory Junkies is its well-roundedness, with guest horn players, rocking viola, smart harmonies and a few licks from accordion player Michael Bergman. “My husband grew up with him,” Miraglia said. “He’s played with Yo-Yo Ma and done work with Francis Ford Coppola. He’s done really well for himself over the years.” Bergman emailed his contribution, and other contributors stopped by the couple’s home studio to do their parts.

When guest tracks were done, they spent the early months of 2015 fleshing out the record – and battling the worst winter in Boston’s history. “It was dreadful … making a record with my husband in between going out and shoveling out cars and trying to find parking spots in the city,” Miraglia said. “When I talk about the record I keep saying that it was a test of all relationships. If you could get through last winter with your spouse or your loved one, then it’s real.”

Danielle Miraglia
When: Saturday, June 25, 9 p.m.
Where: Portsmouth Book & Bar, 40 Pleasant St., Portsmouth
Tickets: $5 – see daniellem.com

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