Same old story – publisher preoccupied by paper

Bran HambricA few months ago, “The Last Tycoon,”  T.J. Stiles’ biography of Cornelius Vanderbilt, received several withering reviews on Amazon.com.  Most of the critics hadn’t even read it.  They were owners of Amazon’s ridiculously successful Kindle digital reader.  Their enmity stemmed from the book’s high price in digital format – well north of the typical $9.99 for most titles.

Ultimately, the publisher reduced “The Last Tycoon” to $9.99, and presumably the reviews improved.

Apparently,  Sourcebooks, Inc. didn’t get the word, or worse, believe they can swim against the digital tide.  After all, the music business stuck to its guns, and CD sales are doing so well.  Why not the publishing business?

Oh, wait, iTunes is kicking everyone’s butt.  Nevermind.

Sourcebooks won’t be releasing their upc0ming Harry Potter wannabe,  “Bran Hambric: The Fairfield Curse,” by Kaleb Nation, in digital form – at least not initially.  Here’s why:

“It doesn’t make sense for a new book to be valued at $9.99,” said Dominique Raccah, CEO of Sourcebooks, which issues 250 to 300 new titles annually. “The argument is that the cheaper the book is, the more people will buy it. But hardcover books have an audience, and we shouldn’t cannibalize it.” An e-book for “Bran Hambric” will become available in the spring, she said.

That’s close to the same logic employed by the music business, but Trident Media Group’s Robert Gottleib takes it a step further:

“It’s no different than releasing a DVD on the same day that a new movie is released in the movie theaters,” he said. “Why would you do that?”

Considering the post-theater revenue of most movies, a better question might be why wouldn’t you do that?  Since the advent of the VCR, personal ownership of films has skyrocketed.  In the mid-80’s, when the standard price for a cassette dropped to a reasonable level, sales jumped.  It’s easy to forget that once upon a time it cost 69 bucks to buy a rental copy of “Foul Play” for your own use.

I’ve had a Kindle since Christmas, and since that time my reading budget hasn’t really changed. I do have more to choose from, so publishers are making less per title from me.  But that’s not a bad thing when you consider that I’m finding new authors, broadening my horizons.

Kaleb Nation is a first-time novelist.  How can limiting the availability of his work help his career – especially among the hardcore readers who own a Kindle?